About

The NCC Plan for LeBreton​

The NCC Plan
for LeBreton

The National Capital Commission (NCC) is updating its Master Concept Plan for the LeBreton development. Key milestones include a draft to be released in November 2019 and a final plan to be presented for approval by the NCC Board in January 2020. The NCC launched public consultations in June, continuing through the fall, and will consider development best practices from cities in Canada and internationally.

For more about the NCC plans:
http://ncc-ccn.gc.ca/projects/building-lebreton

The CBA Experience​

CBAs are catching on everywhere. In Ottawa’s Herongate neighbourhood, citizens and community groups are advocating to be part of a CBA with requirements for affordable housing, jobs and training, green space and amenities.

Federally, the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority is showing leadership through a Community Benefits Plan for the Windsor-Detroit Gordie Howe International Bridge development which includes exploring business opportunities with First Nations and providing training and apprenticeships.

Using a CBA framework developed by the Toronto Community Benefits Network, CBAs are in place or being negotiated for the Metrolinx Eglinton transit project and the former Woodbine Raceway lands. Meanwhile, in the Toronto Parkdale neighbourhood, a comprehensive community benefits framework is taking the concept of community benefits to the next level, setting targets for, among other things, reserving new commercial space at rates affordable for co-operative and social enterprises, local businesses, and community organizations.

LeBreton Flats History​

 

Two centuries of squabbles and reversals

For Indigenous peoples, the Ottawa River was a major transportation route. Forced to portage around Chaudière Falls for millennia, they camped and traded on what would later become known as LeBreton Flats.

Europeans began to settle nearby in the early 1800s and built the region’s first lumber mill on the north side of the Ottawa River, at Wrightstown (later Hull and Gatineau).

In 1828, a legal showdown over the land led to its award to M. LeBreton, a War of 1812 veteran, over the protests of Lord Dalhousie and Colonel By, who wanted to link the canal to the Ottawa River along the LeBreton shore. 

Palace House, 183 Broad St. Lebreton Flats early 1900's - from collector Ross Dunn
Great Fire in Ottawa. April 26, 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn

Since then, the Flats have been: 

    • Claimed by the Algonquin-Anishinaabe peoples, who in 1830 were offered “a better class of rifle and a blanket” in compensation after the land was taken from them; 
    • Transformed into an industrial zone and working-class community fuelled by the growth of an internationally renowned lumber business and milling complex; 
    • Almost entirely destroyed by the massive fire that began at the mills in 1900; 
    • Re-built into a vibrant working-class community;
    • Expropriated in 1962 by the federal government, who forced residents to move away in favour of “a dazzling new annex to Parliament Hill and Wellington Street” that was never built. 


The End for Old LeBreton Flats

This long and troubled history, along with the ongoing failure to make effective use of LeBreton Flats, inspires the LeBreton Flats Community Benefits Coalition to work for a sustainable and equitable mixed-use community supporting a large and diverse resident population, as well as providing a strong base for local employment and services.

To do less would be to dishonour the history of LeBreton Flats and the many sacrifices made by its former residents.

Lebreton Flats after the Great Fire of 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn

LeBreton Flats History​

Palace House, 183 Broad St. Lebreton Flats early 1900's - from collector Ross Dunn

 

Two centuries of squabbles and reversals

For Indigenous peoples, the Ottawa River was a major transportation route. Forced to portage around Chaudière Falls for millennia, they camped and traded on what would later become known as LeBreton Flats.

Europeans began to settle nearby in the early 1800s and built the region’s first lumber mill on the north side of the Ottawa River, at Wrightstown (later Hull and Gatineau).

In 1828, a legal showdown over the land led to its award to M. LeBreton, a War of 1812 veteran, over the protests of Lord Dalhousie and Colonel By, who wanted to link the canal to the Ottawa River along the LeBreton shore. 

Great Fire in Ottawa. April 26, 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn

Since then, the Flats have been: 

    • Claimed by the Algonquin-Anishinaabe peoples, who in 1830 were offered “a better class of rifle and a blanket” in compensation after the land was taken from them; 
    • Transformed into an industrial zone and working-class community fuelled by the growth of an internationally renowned lumber business and milling complex; 
    • Almost entirely destroyed by the massive fire that began at the mills in 1900; 
    • Re-built into a vibrant working-class community;
    • Expropriated in 1962 by the federal government, who forced residents to move away in favour of “a dazzling new annex to Parliament Hill and Wellington Street” that was never built. 
Lebreton Flats after the Great Fire of 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn


The End for Old LeBreton Flats

This long and troubled history, along with the ongoing failure to make effective use of LeBreton Flats, inspires the LeBreton Flats Community Benefits Coalition to work for a sustainable and equitable mixed-use community supporting a large and diverse resident population, as well as providing a strong base for local employment and services.

To do less would be to dishonour the history of LeBreton Flats and the many sacrifices made by its former residents.

LeBreton Flats History​

Palace House, 183 Broad St. Lebreton Flats early 1900's - from collector Ross Dunn

 

Two centuries of squabbles and reversals

For Indigenous peoples, the Ottawa River was a major transportation route. Forced to portage around Chaudière Falls for millennia, they camped and traded on what would later become known as LeBreton Flats.

Europeans began to settle nearby in the early 1800s and built the region’s first lumber mill on the north side of the Ottawa River, at Wrightstown (later Hull and Gatineau).

In 1828, a legal showdown over the land led to its award to M. LeBreton, a War of 1812 veteran, over the protests of Lord Dalhousie and Colonel By, who wanted to link the canal to the Ottawa River along the LeBreton shore. 

Great Fire in Ottawa. April 26, 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn

Since then, the Flats have been: 

    • Claimed by the Algonquin-Anishinaabe peoples, who in 1830 were offered “a better class of rifle and a blanket” in compensation after the land was taken from them; 
    • Transformed into an industrial zone and working-class community fuelled by the growth of an internationally renowned lumber business and milling complex; 
    • Almost entirely destroyed by the massive fire that began at the mills in 1900; 
    • Re-built into a vibrant working-class community;
    • Expropriated in 1962 by the federal government, who forced residents to move away in favour of “a dazzling new annex to Parliament Hill and Wellington Street” that was never built. 
Lebreton Flats after the Great Fire of 1900 - from collector Ross Dunn


The End for Old LeBreton Flats

This long and troubled history, along with the ongoing failure to make effective use of LeBreton Flats, inspires the LeBreton Flats Community Benefits Coalition to work for a sustainable and equitable mixed-use community supporting a large and diverse resident population, as well as providing a strong base for local employment and services.

To do less would be to dishonour the history of LeBreton Flats and the many sacrifices made by its former residents.

The “Lost Community”
of LeBreton Flats

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